Functions

Built-in Functions

abs

abs(expr) - Returns the absolute value of the numeric value.

Examples:

> SELECT abs(-1);
 1



acos

acos(expr) - Returns the inverse cosine (a.k.a. arc cosine) of expr, as if computed by java.lang.Math.acos.

Examples:

> SELECT acos(1);
 0.0
> SELECT acos(2);
 NaN



acosh

acosh(expr) - Returns inverse hyperbolic cosine of expr.

Examples:

> SELECT acosh(1);
 0.0
> SELECT acosh(0);
 NaN

Since: 3.0.0




add_months

add_months(start_date, num_months) - Returns the date that is num_months after start_date.

Examples:

> SELECT add_months('2016-08-31', 1);
 2016-09-30

Since: 1.5.0


aggregate

aggregate(expr, start, merge, finish) - Applies a binary operator to an initial state and all elements in the array, and reduces this to a single state. The final state is converted into the final result by applying a finish function.

Examples:

> SELECT aggregate(array(1, 2, 3), 0, (acc, x) -> acc + x);
 6
> SELECT aggregate(array(1, 2, 3), 0, (acc, x) -> acc + x, acc -> acc * 10);
 60

Since: 2.4.0


and

expr1 and expr2 - Logical AND.




any

any(expr) - Returns true if at least one value of expr is true.

Examples:

> SELECT any(col) FROM VALUES (true), (false), (false) AS tab(col);
 true
> SELECT any(col) FROM VALUES (NULL), (true), (false) AS tab(col);
 true
> SELECT any(col) FROM VALUES (false), (false), (NULL) AS tab(col);
 false

Since: 3.0.0


approx_count_distinct

approx_count_distinct(expr[, relativeSD]) - Returns the estimated cardinality by HyperLogLog++. relativeSD defines the maximum relative standard deviation allowed.

Examples:

> SELECT approx_count_distinct(col1) FROM VALUES (1), (1), (2), (2), (3) tab(col1);
 3

Since: 1.6.0


approx_percentile

approx_percentile(col, percentage [, accuracy]) - Returns the approximate percentile value of numeric column col at the given percentage. The value of percentage must be between 0.0 and 1.0. The accuracy parameter (default: 10000) is a positive numeric literal which controls approximation accuracy at the cost of memory. Higher value of accuracy yields better accuracy, 1.0/accuracy is the relative error of the approximation. When accuracy is an array, each value of the percentage array must be between 0.0 and 1.0. In this case, returns the approximate percentile array of column col at the given percentage array.

Examples:

> SELECT approx_percentile(10.0, array(0.5, 0.4, 0.1), 100);
 [10.0,10.0,10.0]
> SELECT approx_percentile(10.0, 0.5, 100);
 10.0

Since: 2.1.0


array

array(expr, ...) - Returns an array with the given elements.

Examples:

> SELECT array(1, 2, 3);
 [1,2,3]



array_contains

array_contains(array, value) - Returns true if the array contains the value.

Examples:

> SELECT array_contains(array(1, 2, 3), 2);
 true



array_distinct

array_distinct(array) - Removes duplicate values from the array.

Examples:

> SELECT array_distinct(array(1, 2, 3, null, 3));
 [1,2,3,null]

Since: 2.4.0


array_except

array_except(array1, array2) - Returns an array of the elements in array1 but not in array2, without duplicates.

Examples:

> SELECT array_except(array(1, 2, 3), array(1, 3, 5));
 [2]

Since: 2.4.0


array_intersect

array_intersect(array1, array2) - Returns an array of the elements in the intersection of array1 and array2, without duplicates.

Examples:

> SELECT array_intersect(array(1, 2, 3), array(1, 3, 5));
 [1,3]

Since: 2.4.0


array_join

array_join(array, delimiter[, nullReplacement]) - Concatenates the elements of the given array using the delimiter and an optional string to replace nulls. If no value is set for nullReplacement, any null value is filtered.

Examples:

> SELECT array_join(array('hello', 'world'), ' ');
 hello world
> SELECT array_join(array('hello', null ,'world'), ' ');
 hello world
> SELECT array_join(array('hello', null ,'world'), ' ', ',');
 hello , world

Since: 2.4.0


array_max

array_max(array) - Returns the maximum value in the array. NULL elements are skipped.

Examples:

> SELECT array_max(array(1, 20, null, 3));
 20

Since: 2.4.0


array_min

array_min(array) - Returns the minimum value in the array. NULL elements are skipped.

Examples:

> SELECT array_min(array(1, 20, null, 3));
 1

Since: 2.4.0


array_position

array_position(array, element) - Returns the (1-based) index of the first element of the array as long.

Examples:

> SELECT array_position(array(3, 2, 1), 1);
 3

Since: 2.4.0


array_remove

array_remove(array, element) - Remove all elements that equal to element from array.

Examples:

> SELECT array_remove(array(1, 2, 3, null, 3), 3);
 [1,2,null]

Since: 2.4.0


array_repeat

array_repeat(element, count) - Returns the array containing element count times.

Examples:

> SELECT array_repeat('123', 2);
 ["123","123"]

Since: 2.4.0


array_sort

array_sort(expr, func) - Sorts the input array. If func is omitted, sort in ascending order. The elements of the input array must be orderable. Null elements will be placed at the end of the returned array. Since 3.0.0 this function also sorts and returns the array based on the given comparator function. The comparator will take two arguments representing two elements of the array. It returns -1, 0, or 1 as the first element is less than, equal to, or greater than the second element. If the comparator function returns other values (including null), the function will fail and raise an error.

Examples:

> SELECT array_sort(array(5, 6, 1), (left, right) -> case when left < right then -1 when left > right then 1 else 0 end);
 [1,5,6]
> SELECT array_sort(array('bc', 'ab', 'dc'), (left, right) -> case when left is null and right is null then 0 when left is null then -1 when right is null then 1 when left < right then 1 when left > right then -1 else 0 end);
 ["dc","bc","ab"]
> SELECT array_sort(array('b', 'd', null, 'c', 'a'));
 ["a","b","c","d",null]

Since: 2.4.0


array_union

array_union(array1, array2) - Returns an array of the elements in the union of array1 and array2, without duplicates.

Examples:

> SELECT array_union(array(1, 2, 3), array(1, 3, 5));
 [1,2,3,5]

Since: 2.4.0


arrays_overlap

arrays_overlap(a1, a2) - Returns true if a1 contains at least a non-null element present also in a2. If the arrays have no common element and they are both non-empty and either of them contains a null element null is returned, false otherwise.

Examples:

> SELECT arrays_overlap(array(1, 2, 3), array(3, 4, 5));
 true

Since: 2.4.0


arrays_zip

arrays_zip(a1, a2, ...) - Returns a merged array of structs in which the N-th struct contains all N-th values of input arrays.

Examples:

> SELECT arrays_zip(array(1, 2, 3), array(2, 3, 4));
 [{"0":1,"1":2},{"0":2,"1":3},{"0":3,"1":4}]
> SELECT arrays_zip(array(1, 2), array(2, 3), array(3, 4));
 [{"0":1,"1":2,"2":3},{"0":2,"1":3,"2":4}]

Since: 2.4.0


ascii

ascii(str) - Returns the numeric value of the first character of str.

Examples:

> SELECT ascii('222');
 50
> SELECT ascii(2);
 50

Since: 1.5.0


asin

asin(expr) - Returns the inverse sine (a.k.a. arc sine) the arc sin of expr, as if computed by java.lang.Math.asin.

Examples:

> SELECT asin(0);
 0.0
> SELECT asin(2);
 NaN



asinh

asinh(expr) - Returns inverse hyperbolic sine of expr.

Examples:

> SELECT asinh(0);
 0.0

Since: 3.0.0


assert_true

assert_true(expr) - Throws an exception if expr is not true.

Examples:

> SELECT assert_true(0 < 1);
 NULL



atan

atan(expr) - Returns the inverse tangent (a.k.a. arc tangent) of expr, as if computed by java.lang.Math.atan

Examples:

> SELECT atan(0);
 0.0



atan2

atan2(exprY, exprX) - Returns the angle in radians between the positive x-axis of a plane and the point given by the coordinates (exprX, exprY), as if computed by java.lang.Math.atan2.

Arguments:

  • exprY - coordinate on y-axis
  • exprX - coordinate on x-axis

Examples:

> SELECT atan2(0, 0);
 0.0



atanh

atanh(expr) - Returns inverse hyperbolic tangent of expr.

Examples:

> SELECT atanh(0);
 0.0
> SELECT atanh(2);
 NaN

Since: 3.0.0


avg

avg(expr) - Returns the mean calculated from values of a group.

Examples:

> SELECT avg(col) FROM VALUES (1), (2), (3) AS tab(col);
 2.0
> SELECT avg(col) FROM VALUES (1), (2), (NULL) AS tab(col);
 1.5

Since: 1.0.0


base64

base64(bin) - Converts the argument from a binary bin to a base 64 string.

Examples:

> SELECT base64('Spark SQL');
 U3BhcmsgU1FM

Since: 1.5.0


bigint

bigint(expr) - Casts the value expr to the target data type bigint.




bin

bin(expr) - Returns the string representation of the long value expr represented in binary.

Examples:

> SELECT bin(13);
 1101
> SELECT bin(-13);
 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110011
> SELECT bin(13.3);
 1101



binary

binary(expr) - Casts the value expr to the target data type binary.




bit_and

bit_and(expr) - Returns the bitwise AND of all non-null input values, or null if none.

Examples:

> SELECT bit_and(col) FROM VALUES (3), (5) AS tab(col);
 1

Since: 3.0.0


bit_count

bit_count(expr) - Returns the number of bits that are set in the argument expr as an unsigned 64-bit integer, or NULL if the argument is NULL.

Examples:

> SELECT bit_count(0);
 0

Since: 3.0.0


bit_length

bit_length(expr) - Returns the bit length of string data or number of bits of binary data.

Examples:

> SELECT bit_length('Spark SQL');
 72

Since: 2.3.0


bit_or

bit_or(expr) - Returns the bitwise OR of all non-null input values, or null if none.

Examples:

> SELECT bit_or(col) FROM VALUES (3), (5) AS tab(col);
 7

Since: 3.0.0


bit_xor

bit_xor(expr) - Returns the bitwise XOR of all non-null input values, or null if none.

Examples:

> SELECT bit_xor(col) FROM VALUES (3), (5) AS tab(col);
 6

Since: 3.0.0


bool_and

bool_and(expr) - Returns true if all values of expr are true.

Examples:

> SELECT bool_and(col) FROM VALUES (true), (true), (true) AS tab(col);
 true
> SELECT bool_and(col) FROM VALUES (NULL), (true), (true) AS tab(col);
 true
> SELECT bool_and(col) FROM VALUES (true), (false), (true) AS tab(col);
 false

Since: 3.0.0


bool_or

bool_or(expr) - Returns true if at least one value of expr is true.

Examples:

> SELECT bool_or(col) FROM VALUES (true), (false), (false) AS tab(col);
 true
> SELECT bool_or(col) FROM VALUES (NULL), (true), (false) AS tab(col);
 true
> SELECT bool_or(col) FROM VALUES (false), (false), (NULL) AS tab(col);
 false

Since: 3.0.0


boolean

boolean(expr) - Casts the value expr to the target data type boolean.



bround

bround(expr, d) - Returns expr rounded to d decimal places using HALF_EVEN rounding mode.

Examples:

> SELECT bround(2.5, 0);
 2



cardinality

cardinality(expr) - Returns the size of an array or a map. The function returns null for null input if spark.sql.legacy.sizeOfNull is set to false or spark.sql.ansi.enabled is set to true. Otherwise, the function returns -1 for null input. With the default settings, the function returns -1 for null input.

Examples:

> SELECT cardinality(array('b', 'd', 'c', 'a'));
 4
> SELECT cardinality(map('a', 1, 'b', 2));
 2
> SELECT cardinality(NULL);
 -1



cast

cast(expr AS type) - Casts the value expr to the target data type type.

Examples:

> SELECT cast('10' as int);
 10



cbrt

cbrt(expr) - Returns the cube root of expr.

Examples:

> SELECT cbrt(27.0);
 3.0



ceil

ceil(expr) - Returns the smallest integer not smaller than expr.

Examples:

> SELECT ceil(-0.1);
 0
> SELECT ceil(5);
 5



ceiling

ceiling(expr) - Returns the smallest integer not smaller than expr.

Examples:

> SELECT ceiling(-0.1);
 0
> SELECT ceiling(5);
 5



char

char(expr) - Returns the ASCII character having the binary equivalent to expr. If n is larger than 256 the result is equivalent to chr(n % 256)

Examples:

> SELECT char(65);
 A

Since: 2.3.0


char_length

char_length(expr) - Returns the character length of string data or number of bytes of binary data. The length of string data includes the trailing spaces. The length of binary data includes binary zeros.

Examples:

> SELECT char_length('Spark SQL ');
 10
> SELECT CHAR_LENGTH('Spark SQL ');
 10
> SELECT CHARACTER_LENGTH('Spark SQL ');
 10

Since: 1.5.0


character_length

character_length(expr) - Returns the character length of string data or number of bytes of binary data. The length of string data includes the trailing spaces. The length of binary data includes binary zeros.

Examples:

> SELECT character_length('Spark SQL ');
 10
> SELECT CHAR_LENGTH('Spark SQL ');
 10
> SELECT CHARACTER_LENGTH('Spark SQL ');
 10

Since: 1.5.0


chr

chr(expr) - Returns the ASCII character having the binary equivalent to expr. If n is larger than 256 the result is equivalent to chr(n % 256)

Examples:

> SELECT chr(65);
 A

Since: 2.3.0


coalesce

coalesce(expr1, expr2, ...) - Returns the first non-null argument if exists. Otherwise, null.

Examples:

> SELECT coalesce(NULL, 1, NULL);
 1

Since: 1.0.0


collect_list

collect_list(expr) - Collects and returns a list of non-unique elements.

Examples:

> SELECT collect_list(col) FROM VALUES (1), (2), (1) AS tab(col);
 [1,2,1]

Note:
The function is non-deterministic because the order of collected results depends on the order of the rows which may be non-deterministic after a shuffle.

Since: 2.0.0


collect_set

collect_set(expr) - Collects and returns a set of unique elements.

Examples:

> SELECT collect_set(col) FROM VALUES (1), (2), (1) AS tab(col);
 [1,2]

Note:
The function is non-deterministic because the order of collected results depends on the order of the rows which may be non-deterministic after a shuffle.

Since: 2.0.0


concat

concat(col1, col2, ..., colN) - Returns the concatenation of col1, col2, ..., colN.

Examples:

> SELECT concat('Spark', 'SQL');
 SparkSQL
> SELECT concat(array(1, 2, 3), array(4, 5), array(6));
 [1,2,3,4,5,6]

Note:
Concat logic for arrays is available since 2.4.0.




concat_ws

concat_ws(sep, [str | array(str)]+) - Returns the concatenation of the strings separated by sep.

Examples:

> SELECT concat_ws(' ', 'Spark', 'SQL');
  Spark SQL

Since: 1.5.0


conv

conv(num, from_base, to_base) - Convert num from from_base to to_base.

Examples:

> SELECT conv('100', 2, 10);
 4
> SELECT conv(-10, 16, -10);
 -16



corr

corr(expr1, expr2) - Returns Pearson coefficient of correlation between a set of number pairs.

Examples:

> SELECT corr(c1, c2) FROM VALUES (3, 2), (3, 3), (6, 4) as tab(c1, c2);
 0.8660254037844387

Since: 1.6.0


cos

cos(expr) - Returns the cosine of expr, as if computed by java.lang.Math.cos.

Arguments

  • expr - angle in radians

Examples:

> SELECT cos(0);
 1.0



cosh

cosh(expr) - Returns the hyperbolic cosine of expr, as if computed by java.lang.Math.cosh.

Arguments

  • expr - hyperbolic angle

Examples:

> SELECT cosh(0);
 1.0



cot

cot(expr) - Returns the cotangent of expr, as if computed by 1/java.lang.Math.cot.

Arguments

  • expr - angle in radians

Examples:

> SELECT cot(1);
 0.6420926159343306



count

count(*) - Returns the total number of retrieved rows, including rows containing null.

count(expr[, expr...]) - Returns the number of rows for which the supplied expression(s) are all non-null.

count(DISTINCT expr[, expr...]) - Returns the number of rows for which the supplied expression(s) are unique and non-null.

Examples:

> SELECT count(*) FROM VALUES (NULL), (5), (5), (20) AS tab(col);
 4
> SELECT count(col) FROM VALUES (NULL), (5), (5), (20) AS tab(col);
 3
> SELECT count(DISTINCT col) FROM VALUES (NULL), (5), (5), (10) AS tab(col);
 2

Since: 1.0.0


count_if

count_if(expr) - Returns the number of TRUE values for the expression.

Examples:

> SELECT count_if(col % 2 = 0) FROM VALUES (NULL), (0), (1), (2), (3) AS tab(col);
 2
> SELECT count_if(col IS NULL) FROM VALUES (NULL), (0), (1), (2), (3) AS tab(col);
 1

Since: 3.0.0


count_min_sketch

count_min_sketch(col, eps, confidence, seed) - Returns a count-min sketch of a column with the given esp, confidence and seed. The result is an array of bytes, which can be deserialized to a CountMinSketch before usage. Count-min sketch is a probabilistic data structure used for cardinality estimation using sub-linear space.

Since: 2.2.0


covar_pop

covar_pop(expr1, expr2) - Returns the population covariance of a set of number pairs.

Examples:

> SELECT covar_pop(c1, c2) FROM VALUES (1,1), (2,2), (3,3) AS tab(c1, c2);
 0.6666666666666666

Since: 2.0.0


covar_samp

covar_samp(expr1, expr2) - Returns the sample covariance of a set of number pairs.

Examples:

> SELECT covar_samp(c1, c2) FROM VALUES (1,1), (2,2), (3,3) AS tab(c1, c2);
 1.0

Since: 2.0.0


crc32

crc32(expr) - Returns a cyclic redundancy check value of the ``expr``` as a bigint.

Examples:

> SELECT crc32('Spark');
 1557323817



cube

cube([col1[, col2 ..]]) - create a multi-dimensional cube using the specified columns so that we can run aggregation on them.

Examples:

> SELECT name, age, count(*) FROM VALUES (2, 'Alice'), (5, 'Bob') people(age, name) GROUP BY cube(name, age);
  Bob   5   1
  Alice 2   1
  NULL  NULL    2
  NULL  5   1
  Bob   NULL    1
  Alice NULL    1
  NULL  2   1

Since: 2.0.0


cume_dist

cume_dist() - Computes the position of a value relative to all values in the partition.

Since: 2.0.0


current_database

current_database() - Returns the current database.

Examples:

> SELECT current_database();
 default



current_date

current_date() - Returns the current date at the start of query evaluation.

current_date - Returns the current date at the start of query evaluation.

Examples:

> SELECT current_date();
 2020-04-25
> SELECT current_date;
 2020-04-25

Note:
The syntax without braces has been supported since 2.0.1.

Since: 1.5.0


current_timestamp

current_timestamp() - Returns the current timestamp at the start of query evaluation.

current_timestamp - Returns the current timestamp at the start of query evaluation.

Examples:

> SELECT current_timestamp();
 2020-04-25 15:49:11.914
> SELECT current_timestamp;
 2020-04-25 15:49:11.914

Note:
The syntax without braces has been supported since 2.0.1.

Since: 1.5.0


date

date(expr) - Casts the value expr to the target data type date.




date_add

date_add(start_date, num_days) - Returns the date that is num_days after start_date.

Examples:

> SELECT date_add('2016-07-30', 1);
 2016-07-31

Since: 1.5.0


date_format

date_format(timestamp, fmt) - Converts timestamp to a value of string in the format specified by the date format fmt.

Arguments:

  • timestamp - A date/timestamp or string to be converted to the given format.
  • fmt - Date/time format pattern to follow. See Datetime Patterns for valid date and time format patterns.

Examples:

> SELECT date_format('2016-04-08', 'y');
 2016

Since: 1.5.0


date_part

date_part(field, source) - Extracts a part of the date/timestamp or interval source.

Arguments:

  • field - selects which part of the source should be extracted, and supported string values are as same as the fields of the equivalent function EXTRACT.
  • source - a date/timestamp or interval column from where field should be extracted

Examples:

> SELECT date_part('YEAR', TIMESTAMP '2019-08-12 01:00:00.123456');
 2019
> SELECT date_part('week', timestamp'2019-08-12 01:00:00.123456');
 33
> SELECT date_part('doy', DATE'2019-08-12');
 224
> SELECT date_part('SECONDS', timestamp'2019-10-01 00:00:01.000001');
 1.000001
> SELECT date_part('days', interval 1 year 10 months 5 days);
 5
> SELECT date_part('seconds', interval 5 hours 30 seconds 1 milliseconds 1 microseconds);
 30.001001

Note:
The date_part function is equivalent to the SQL-standard function EXTRACT(field FROM source)

Since: 3.0.0


date_sub

date_sub(start_date, num_days) - Returns the date that is num_days before start_date.

Examples:

> SELECT date_sub('2016-07-30', 1);
 2016-07-29

Since: 1.5.0


date_trunc

date_trunc(fmt, ts) - Returns timestamp ts truncated to the unit specified by the format model fmt.

Examples:

> SELECT date_trunc('YEAR', '2015-03-05T09:32:05.359');
 2015-01-01 00:00:00
> SELECT date_trunc('MM', '2015-03-05T09:32:05.359');
 2015-03-01 00:00:00
> SELECT date_trunc('DD', '2015-03-05T09:32:05.359');
 2015-03-05 00:00:00
> SELECT date_trunc('HOUR', '2015-03-05T09:32:05.359');
 2015-03-05 09:00:00
> SELECT date_trunc('MILLISECOND', '2015-03-05T09:32:05.123456');
 2015-03-05 09:32:05.123

Since: 2.3.0


datediff

datediff(endDate, startDate) - Returns the number of days from startDate to endDate.

Examples:

> SELECT datediff('2009-07-31', '2009-07-30');
 1

> SELECT datediff('2009-07-30', '2009-07-31');
 -1

Since: 1.5.0


day

day(date) - Returns the day of month of the date/timestamp.

Examples:

> SELECT day('2009-07-30');
 30

Since: 1.5.0


dayofmonth

dayofmonth(date) - Returns the day of month of the date/timestamp.

Examples:

> SELECT dayofmonth('2009-07-30');
 30

Since: 1.5.0


dayofweek

dayofweek(date) - Returns the day of the week for date/timestamp (1 = Sunday, 2 = Monday, ..., 7 = Saturday).

Examples:

> SELECT dayofweek('2009-07-30');
 5

Since: 2.3.0


dayofyear

dayofyear(date) - Returns the day of year of the date/timestamp.

Examples:

> SELECT dayofyear('2016-04-09');
 100

Since: 1.5.0


decimal

decimal(expr) - Casts the value expr to the target data type decimal.




decode

decode(bin, charset) - Decodes the first argument using the second argument character set.

Examples:

> SELECT decode(encode('abc', 'utf-8'), 'utf-8');
 abc

Since: 1.5.0


degrees

degrees(expr) - Converts radians to degrees.

Arguments:

  • expr - angle in radians

Examples:

> SELECT degrees(3.141592653589793);
 180.0



dense_rank

dense_rank() - Computes the rank of a value in a group of values. The result is one plus the previously assigned rank value. Unlike the function rank, dense_rank will not produce gaps in the ranking sequence.

Arguments:

  • children - this is to base the rank on; a change in the value of one the children will trigger a change in rank. This is an internal parameter and will be assigned by the Analyser.

Since: 2.0.0




div

expr1 div expr2 - Divide expr1 by expr2. It returns NULL if an operand is NULL or expr2 is 0. The result is casted to long.

Examples:

> SELECT 3 div 2;
 1

Since: 3.0.0




double

double(expr) - Casts the value expr to the target data type double.




e

e() - Returns Euler's number, e.

Examples:

> SELECT e();
 2.718281828459045



element_at

element_at(array, index) - Returns element of array at given (1-based) index. If index < 0, accesses elements from the last to the first. Returns NULL if the index exceeds the length of the array.
element_at(map, key) - Returns value for given key, or NULL if the key is not contained in the map

Examples:

> SELECT element_at(array(1, 2, 3), 2);
 2
> SELECT element_at(map(1, 'a', 2, 'b'), 2);
 b

Since:2.4.0


elt

elt(n, input1, input2, ...) - Returns the n-th input, e.g., returns input2 when n is 2.

Examples:

> SELECT elt(1, 'scala', 'java');
 scala

Since:2.0.0


encode

encode(str, charset) - Encodes the first argument using the second argument character set.

Examples:

> SELECT encode('abc', 'utf-8');
 abc

Since:1.5.0


every

every(expr) - Returns true if all values of expr are true.

Examples:

> SELECT every(col) FROM VALUES (true), (true), (true) AS tab(col);
 true
> SELECT every(col) FROM VALUES (NULL), (true), (true) AS tab(col);
 true
> SELECT every(col) FROM VALUES (true), (false), (true) AS tab(col);
 false

Since:3.0.0


exists

exists(expr, pred) - Tests whether a predicate holds for one or more elements in the array.

Examples:

> SELECT exists(array(1, 2, 3), x -> x % 2 == 0);
 true
> SELECT exists(array(1, 2, 3), x -> x % 2 == 10);
 false
> SELECT exists(array(1, null, 3), x -> x % 2 == 0);
 NULL
> SELECT exists(array(0, null, 2, 3, null), x -> x IS NULL);
 true
> SELECT exists(array(1, 2, 3), x -> x IS NULL);
 false

Since:2.4.0


exp

exp(expr) - Returns e to the power of expr.

Examples:

> SELECT exp(0);
 1.0



explode

explode(expr) - Separates the elements of array expr into multiple rows, or the elements of map expr into multiple rows and columns. Unless specified otherwise, uses the default column name col for elements of the array or keyand value for the elements of the map.

Examples:

> SELECT explode(array(10, 20));
 10
 20



explode_outer

explode_outer(expr) - Separates the elements of array expr into multiple rows, or the elements of map expr into multiple rows and columns. Unless specified otherwise, uses the default column name col for elements of the array or key and value for the elements of the map.

Examples:

> SELECT explode_outer(array(10, 20));
 10
 20



expm1

expm1(expr) - Returns exp(expr) - 1.

Examples:

> SELECT expm1(0);
 0.0

extract(field FROM source) - Extracts a part of the date/timestamp or interval source.

Arguments:

  • field - selects which part of the source should be extracted

    • Supported string values of field for dates and timestamps are(case insensitive):

      • "YEAR", ("Y", "YEARS", "YR", "YRS") - the year field
      • "YEAROFWEEK" - the ISO 8601 week-numbering year that the datetime falls in. For example, 2005-01-02 is part of the 53rd week of year 2004, so the result is 2004
      • "QUARTER", ("QTR") - the quarter (1 - 4) of the year that the datetime falls in
      • "MONTH", ("MON", "MONS", "MONTHS") - the month field (1 - 12)
      • "WEEK", ("W", "WEEKS") - the number of the ISO 8601 week-of-week-based-year. A week is considered to start on a Monday and week 1 is the first week with >3 days. In the ISO week-numbering system, it is possible for early-January dates to be part of the 52nd or 53rd week of the previous year, and for late-December dates to be part of the first week of the next year. For example, 2005-01-02 is part of the 53rd week of year 2004, while 2012-12-31 is part of the first week of 2013
      • "DAY", ("D", "DAYS") - the day of the month field (1 - 31)
      • "DAYOFWEEK",("DOW") - the day of the week for datetime as Sunday(1) to Saturday(7)
      • "DAYOFWEEK_ISO",("DOW_ISO") - ISO 8601 based day of the week for datetime as Monday(1) to Sunday(7)
      • "DOY" - the day of the year (1 - 365/366)
      • "HOUR", ("H", "HOURS", "HR", "HRS") - The hour field (0 - 23)
      • "MINUTE", ("M", "MIN", "MINS", "MINUTES") - the minutes field (0 - 59)
      • "SECOND", ("S", "SEC", "SECONDS", "SECS") - the seconds field, including fractional parts
    • Supported string values of field for interval(which consists of months, days, microseconds) are(case insensitive):

      • "YEAR", ("Y", "YEARS", "YR", "YRS") - the total months / 12
      • "MONTH", ("MON", "MONS", "MONTHS") - the total months % 12
      • "DAY", ("D", "DAYS") - the days part of interval
      • "HOUR", ("H", "HOURS", "HR", "HRS") - how many hours the microseconds contains
      • "MINUTE", ("M", "MIN", "MINS", "MINUTES") - how many minutes left after taking hours from microseconds
      • "SECOND", ("S", "SEC", "SECONDS", "SECS") - how many second with fractions left after taking hours and minutes from microseconds
  • source - a date/timestamp or interval column from where field should be extracted

Examples:

> SELECT extract(YEAR FROM TIMESTAMP '2019-08-12 01:00:00.123456');
 2019
> SELECT extract(week FROM timestamp'2019-08-12 01:00:00.123456');
 33
> SELECT extract(doy FROM DATE'2019-08-12');
 224
> SELECT extract(SECONDS FROM timestamp'2019-10-01 00:00:01.000001');
 1.000001
> SELECT extract(days FROM interval 1 year 10 months 5 days);
 5
> SELECT extract(seconds FROM interval 5 hours 30 seconds 1 milliseconds 1 microseconds);
 30.001001

Note:
The extract function is equivalent to date_part(field, source).

Since: 3.0.0




factorial

factorial(expr) - Returns the factorial of expr. expr is [0..20]. Otherwise, null.

Examples:

> SELECT factorial(5);
 120



filter

filter(expr, func) - Filters the input array using the given predicate.

Examples:

> SELECT filter(array(1, 2, 3), x -> x % 2 == 1);
 [1,3]
> SELECT filter(array(0, 2, 3), (x, i) -> x > i);
 [2,3]
> SELECT filter(array(0, null, 2, 3, null), x -> x IS NOT NULL);
 [0,2,3]

Note:
The inner function may use the index argument since 3.0.0.
Since: 2.4.0


find_in_set

find_in_set(str, str_array) - Returns the index (1-based) of the given string (str) in the comma-delimited list (str_array). Returns 0, if the string was not found or if the given string (str) contains a comma.

Examples:

> SELECT find_in_set('ab','abc,b,ab,c,def');
 3

Note:
The inner function may use the index argument since 3.0.0.

Since: 1.5.0


first

first(expr[, isIgnoreNull]) - Returns the first value of expr for a group of rows. If isIgnoreNull is true, returns only non-null values.

Examples:

> SELECT first(col) FROM VALUES (10), (5), (20) AS tab(col);
 10
> SELECT first(col) FROM VALUES (NULL), (5), (20) AS tab(col);
 NULL
> SELECT first(col, true) FROM VALUES (NULL), (5), (20) AS tab(col);
 5

Note:
The function is non-deterministic because its results depends on the order of the rows which may be non-deterministic after a shuffle.

Since: 2.0.0


first_value

first_value(expr[, isIgnoreNull]) - Returns the first value of expr for a group of rows. If isIgnoreNull is true, returns only non-null values.

Examples:

> SELECT first_value(col) FROM VALUES (10), (5), (20) AS tab(col);
 10
> SELECT first_value(col) FROM VALUES (NULL), (5), (20) AS tab(col);
 NULL
> SELECT first_value(col, true) FROM VALUES (NULL), (5), (20) AS tab(col);
 5

Note:
The function is non-deterministic because its results depends on the order of the rows which may be non-deterministic after a shuffle.

Since: 2.0.0


flatten

flatten(arrayOfArrays) - Transforms an array of arrays into a single array.

Examples:

> SELECT flatten(array(array(1, 2), array(3, 4)));
 [1,2,3,4]

Since: 2.4.0


float

float(expr) - Casts the value expr to the target data type float.




floor

floor(expr) - Returns the largest integer not greater than expr.

Examples:

> SELECT floor(-0.1);
 -1
> SELECT floor(5);
 5



forall

forall(expr, pred) - Tests whether a predicate holds for all elements in the array.

Examples:

> SELECT forall(array(1, 2, 3), x -> x % 2 == 0);
 false
> SELECT forall(array(2, 4, 8), x -> x % 2 == 0);
 true
> SELECT forall(array(1, null, 3), x -> x % 2 == 0);
 false
> SELECT forall(array(2, null, 8), x -> x % 2 == 0);
 NULL

Since: 3.0.0




format_number

format_number(expr1, expr2) - Formats the number expr1 like '#,###,###.##', rounded to expr2 decimal places. If expr2 is 0, the result has no decimal point or fractional part. expr2 also accept a user specified format. This is supposed to function like MySQL's FORMAT.

Examples:

> SELECT format_number(12332.123456, 4);
 12,332.1235
> SELECT format_number(12332.123456, '##################.###');
 12332.123

Since: 1.5.0




format_string

format_string(strfmt, obj, ...) - Returns a formatted string from printf-style format strings.

Examples:

> SELECT format_string("Hello World %d %s", 100, "days");
 Hello World 100 days

Since: 1.5.0




from_csv

from_csv(csvStr, schema[, options]) - Returns a struct value with the given csvStr and schema.

Examples:

> SELECT from_csv('1, 0.8', 'a INT, b DOUBLE');
 {"a":1,"b":0.8}
> SELECT from_csv('26/08/2015', 'time Timestamp', map('timestampFormat', 'dd/MM/yyyy'));
 {"time":2015-08-26 00:00:00}

Since: 3.0.0




from_json

from_json(jsonStr, schema[, options]) - Returns a struct value with the given jsonStr and schema.

Examples:

> SELECT from_json('{"a":1, "b":0.8}', 'a INT, b DOUBLE');
 {"a":1,"b":0.8}
> SELECT from_json('{"time":"26/08/2015"}', 'time Timestamp', map('timestampFormat', 'dd/MM/yyyy'));
 {"time":2015-08-26 00:00:00}

Since: 2.2.0




from_unixtime

from_unixtime(unix_time, format) - Returns unix_time in the specified format.

Arguments:

  • unix_time - UNIX Timestamp to be converted to the provided format.
  • format - Date/time format pattern to follow. See Datetime Patterns for valid date and time format patterns.

Examples:

> SELECT from_unixtime(0, 'yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss');
 1969-12-31 16:00:00

Since: 1.5.0




from_utc_timestamp

from_utc_timestamp(timestamp, timezone) - Given a timestamp like '2017-07-14 02:40:00.0', interprets it as a time in UTC, and renders that time as a timestamp in the given time zone. For example, 'GMT+1' would yield '2017-07-14 03:40:00.0'.

Examples:

> SELECT from_utc_timestamp('2016-08-31', 'Asia/Seoul');
 2016-08-31 09:00:00

Since: 1.5.0




get_json_object

get_json_object(json_txt, path) - Extracts a json object from path.

Examples:

> SELECT get_json_object('{"a":"b"}', '$.a');
 b



greatest

greatest(expr, ...) - Returns the greatest value of all parameters, skipping null values.

Examples:

> SELECT greatest(10, 9, 2, 4, 3);
 10



grouping

grouping(col) - indicates whether a specified column in a GROUP BY is aggregated or not, returns 1 for aggregated or 0 for not aggregated in the result set.",

Examples:

> SELECT name, grouping(name), sum(age) FROM VALUES (2, 'Alice'), (5, 'Bob') people(age, name) GROUP BY cube(name);
  Bob   0   5
  Alice 0   2
  NULL  1   7

Since: 2.0.0




grouping_id

grouping_id([col1[, col2 ..]]) - returns the level of grouping, equals to (grouping(c1) << (n-1)) + (grouping(c2) << (n-2)) + ... + grouping(cn)

Examples:

> SELECT name, grouping_id(), sum(age), avg(height) FROM VALUES (2, 'Alice', 165), (5, 'Bob', 180) people(age, name, height) GROUP BY cube(name, height);
  NULL  2   5   180.0
  Alice 0   2   165.0
  NULL  3   7   172.5
  NULL  2   2   165.0
  Bob   1   5   180.0
  Alice 1   2   165.0
  Bob   0   5   180.0

Note:
Input columns should match with grouping columns exactly, or empty (means all the grouping columns).

Since: 2.0.0




hash

hash(expr1, expr2, ...) - Returns a hash value of the arguments.

Examples:

> SELECT hash('Spark', array(123), 2);
 -1321691492



hex

hex(expr) - Converts expr to hexadecimal.

Examples:

> SELECT hex(17);
 11
> SELECT hex('Spark SQL');
 537061726B2053514C



hour

hour(timestamp) - Returns the hour component of the string/timestamp.

Examples:

> SELECT hour('2009-07-30 12:58:59');
 12

Since: 1.5.0




hypot

hypot(expr1, expr2) - Returns sqrt(expr12 + expr22).

Examples:

> SELECT hypot(3, 4);
 5.0



if

if(expr1, expr2, expr3) - If expr1 evaluates to true, then returns expr2; otherwise returns expr3.

Examples:

> SELECT if(1 < 2, 'a', 'b');
 a



ifnull

ifnull(expr1, expr2) - Returns expr2 if expr1 is null, or expr1 otherwise.

Examples:

> SELECT ifnull(NULL, array('2'));
 ["2"]

Since: 2.0.0




in

expr1 in(expr2, expr3, ...) - Returns true if expr equals to any valN.

Arguments:
expr1, expr2, expr3, ... - the arguments must be same type.

Examples:

> SELECT 1 in(1, 2, 3);
 true
> SELECT 1 in(2, 3, 4);
 false
> SELECT named_struct('a', 1, 'b', 2) in(named_struct('a', 1, 'b', 1), named_struct('a', 1, 'b', 3));
 false
> SELECT named_struct('a', 1, 'b', 2) in(named_struct('a', 1, 'b', 2), named_struct('a', 1, 'b', 3));
 true



initcap

initcap(str) - Returns str with the first letter of each word in uppercase. All other letters are in lowercase. Words are delimited by white space.

Examples:

> SELECT initcap('sPark sql');
 Spark Sql

Since: 1.5.0


inline

inline(expr) - Explodes an array of structs into a table. Uses column names col1, col2, etc. by default unless specified otherwise.

Examples:

> SELECT inline(array(struct(1, 'a'), struct(2, 'b')));
 1  a
 2  b



inline_outer

inline_outer(expr) - Explodes an array of structs into a table. Uses column names col1, col2, etc. by default unless specified otherwise.

Examples:

> SELECT inline_outer(array(struct(1, 'a'), struct(2, 'b')));
 1  a
 2  b



input_file_block_length

input_file_block_length() - Returns the length of the block being read, or -1 if not available.




input_file_block_start

input_file_block_start() - Returns the start offset of the block being read, or -1 if not available.




input_file_name

input_file_name() - Returns the name of the file being read, or empty string if not available.




instr

instr(str, substr) - Returns the (1-based) index of the first occurrence of substr in str.

Examples:

> SELECT instr('SparkSQL', 'SQL');
 6

Since: 1.5.0




int

int(expr) - Casts the value expr to the target data type int.




isnan

isnan(expr) - Returns true if expr is NaN, or false otherwise.

Examples:

> SELECT isnan(cast('NaN' as double));
 true

Since: 1.5.0




isnotnull

isnotnull(expr) - Returns true if expr is not null, or false otherwise.

Examples:

> SELECT isnotnull(1);
 true

Since: 1.0.0




isnull

isnull(expr) - Returns true if expr is null, or false otherwise.

Examples:

> SELECT isnull(1);
 false

Since: 1.0.0




java_method

java_method(class, method[, arg1[, arg2 ..]]) - Calls a method with reflection.

Examples:

> SELECT java_method('java.util.UUID', 'randomUUID');
 c33fb387-8500-4bfa-81d2-6e0e3e930df2
> SELECT java_method('java.util.UUID', 'fromString', 'a5cf6c42-0c85-418f-af6c-3e4e5b1328f2');
 a5cf6c42-0c85-418f-af6c-3e4e5b1328f2



json_tuple

json_tuple(jsonStr, p1, p2, ..., pn) - Returns a tuple like the function get_json_object, but it takes multiple names. All the input parameters and output column types are string.

Examples:

> SELECT json_tuple('{"a":1, "b":2}', 'a', 'b');
 1  2



kurtosis

kurtosis(expr) - Returns the kurtosis value calculated from values of a group.

Examples:

> SELECT kurtosis(col) FROM VALUES (-10), (-20), (100), (1000) AS tab(col);
 -0.7014368047529627
> SELECT kurtosis(col) FROM VALUES (1), (10), (100), (10), (1) as tab(col);
 0.19432323191699075

Since: 1.6.0




lag

lag(input[, offset[, default]]) - Returns the value of input at the offsetth row before the current row in the window. The default value of offset is 1 and the default value of default is null. If the value of input at the offsetth row is null, null is returned. If there is no such offset row (e.g., when the offset is 1, the first row of the window does not have any previous row), default is returned.

Arguments:

  • input - a string expression to evaluate offset rows before the current row.
  • offset - an int expression which is rows to jump back in the partition.
  • default - a string expression which is to use when the offset row does not exist.

Since: 2.0.0




last

last(expr[, isIgnoreNull]) - Returns the last value of expr for a group of rows. If isIgnoreNull is true, returns only non-null values

Examples:

> SELECT last(col) FROM VALUES (10), (5), (20) AS tab(col);
 20
> SELECT last(col) FROM VALUES (10), (5), (NULL) AS tab(col);
 NULL
> SELECT last(col, true) FROM VALUES (10), (5), (NULL) AS tab(col);
 5

Note:
The function is non-deterministic because its results depends on the order of the rows which may be non-deterministic after a shuffle.

Since: 2.0.0




last_day

last_day(date) - Returns the last day of the month which the date belongs to.

Examples:

> SELECT last_day('2009-01-12');
 2009-01-31

Since: 1.5.0




last_value

last_value(expr[, isIgnoreNull]) - Returns the last value of expr for a group of rows. If isIgnoreNull is true, returns only non-null values

Examples:

> SELECT last_value(col) FROM VALUES (10), (5), (20) AS tab(col);
 20
> SELECT last_value(col) FROM VALUES (10), (5), (NULL) AS tab(col);
 NULL
> SELECT last_value(col, true) FROM VALUES (10), (5), (NULL) AS tab(col);
 5

Note:
The function is non-deterministic because its results depends on the order of the rows which may be non-deterministic after a shuffle.

Since: 2.0.0




lcase

lcase(str) - Returns str with all characters changed to lowercase.

Examples:

> SELECT lcase('SparkSql');
 sparksql

Since: 1.0.1




lead

lead(input[, offset[, default]]) - Returns the value of input at the offsetth row after the current row in the window. The default value of offset is 1 and the default value of default is null. If the value of input at the offsetth row is null, null is returned. If there is no such an offset row (e.g., when the offset is 1, the last row of the window does not have any subsequent row), default is returned.

Arguments:

  • input - a string expression to evaluate offset rows after the current row.
  • offset - an int expression which is rows to jump ahead in the partition.
  • default - a string expression which is to use when the offset is larger than the window. The default value is null.

Since: 2.0.0




least

least(expr, ...) - Returns the least value of all parameters, skipping null values.

Examples:

> SELECT least(10, 9, 2, 4, 3);
 2



left

left(str, len) - Returns the leftmost len(len can be string type) characters from the string str,if len is less or equal than 0 the result is an empty string.

Examples:

> SELECT left('Spark SQL', 3);
 Spa

Since: 2.3.0




length

length(expr) - Returns the character length of string data or number of bytes of binary data. The length of string data includes the trailing spaces. The length of binary data includes binary zeros.

Examples:

> SELECT length('Spark SQL ');
 10
> SELECT CHAR_LENGTH('Spark SQL ');
 10
> SELECT CHARACTER_LENGTH('Spark SQL ');
 10

Since: 1.5.0




levenshtein

levenshtein(str1, str2) - Returns the Levenshtein distance between the two given strings.

Examples:

> SELECT levenshtein('kitten', 'sitting');
 3

Since: 1.5.0




like

str like pattern[ ESCAPE escape] - Returns true if str matches pattern with escape, null if any arguments are null, false otherwise.

Arguments:

  • str - a string expression
  • pattern - a string expression. The pattern is a string which is matched literally, with exception to the following special symbols:
    _ matches any one character in the input (similar to . in posix regular expressions)
    % matches zero or more characters in the input (similar to . in posix regular expressions)
    Since Spark 2.0, string literals are unescaped in our SQL parser. For example, in order to match "\abc", the pattern should be "\abc".
    When SQL config 'spark.sql.parser.escapedStringLiterals' is enabled, it fallbacks to Spark 1.6 behavior regarding string literal parsing. For example, if the config is enabled, the pattern to match "\abc" should be "\abc".
    escape - an character added since Spark 3.0. The default escape character is the ''. If an escape character precedes a special symbol or another escape character, the following character is matched literally. It is invalid to escape any other character.

Examples:

> SELECT like('Spark', '_park');
true
> SET spark.sql.parser.escapedStringLiterals=true;
spark.sql.parser.escapedStringLiterals  true
> SELECT '%SystemDrive%\Users\John' like '\%SystemDrive\%\\Users%';
true
> SET spark.sql.parser.escapedStringLiterals=false;
spark.sql.parser.escapedStringLiterals  false
> SELECT '%SystemDrive%\\Users\\John' like '\%SystemDrive\%\\\\Users%';
true
> SELECT '%SystemDrive%/Users/John' like '/%SystemDrive/%//Users%' ESCAPE '/';
true

Note:
Use RLIKE to match with standard regular expressions.

Since: 1.0.0




ln

ln(expr) - Returns the natural logarithm (base e) of expr.

Examples:

> SELECT ln(1);
 0.0



locate

locate(substr, str[, pos]) - Returns the position of the first occurrence of substr in str after position pos. The given pos and return value are 1-based.

Examples:

> SELECT locate('bar', 'foobarbar');
 4
> SELECT locate('bar', 'foobarbar', 5);
 7
> SELECT POSITION('bar' IN 'foobarbar');
 4

Since: 1.5.0




log

log(base, expr) - Returns the logarithm of expr with base.

Examples:

> SELECT log(10, 100);
 2.0



log10

log10(expr) - Returns the logarithm of expr with base 10.

Examples:

> SELECT log10(10);
 1.0



log1p

log1p(expr) - Returns log(1 + expr).

Examples:

> SELECT log1p(0);
 0.0



log2

log2(expr) - Returns the logarithm of expr with base 2.

Examples:

> SELECT log2(2);
 1.0



lower

lower(str) - Returns str with all characters changed to lowercase.

Examples:

> SELECT lower('SparkSql');
 sparksql

Since: 1.0.1




lpad

lpad(str, len[, pad]) - Returns str, left-padded with pad to a length of len. If str is longer than len, the return value is shortened to len characters. If pad is not specified, str will be padded to the left with space characters.

Examples:

> SELECT lpad('hi', 5, '??');
 ???hi
> SELECT lpad('hi', 1, '??');
 h
> SELECT lpad('hi', 5);
    hi

Since: 1.5.1




ltrim

ltrim(str) - Removes the leading space characters from str.

Arguments:

  • str - a string expression
  • trimStr - the trim string characters to trim, the default value is a single space

Examples:

> SELECT ltrim('    SparkSQL   ');
 SparkSQL

Since: 1.5.0




make_date

make_date(year, month, day) - Create date from year, month and day fields.

Arguments:

  • year - the year to represent, from 1 to 9999
  • month - the month-of-year to represent, from 1 (January) to 12 (December)
  • day - the day-of-month to represent, from 1 to 31

Examples:

> SELECT make_date(2013, 7, 15);
 2013-07-15
> SELECT make_date(2019, 13, 1);
 NULL
> SELECT make_date(2019, 7, NULL);
 NULL
> SELECT make_date(2019, 2, 30);
 NULL

Since: 3.0.0




make_interval

make_interval(years, months, weeks, days, hours, mins, secs) - Make interval from years, months, weeks, days, hours, mins and secs.

Arguments:

  • years - the number of years, positive or negative
  • months - the number of months, positive or negative
  • weeks - the number of weeks, positive or negative
  • days - the number of days, positive or negative
  • hours - the number of hours, positive or negative
  • mins - the number of minutes, positive or negative
  • secs - the number of seconds with the fractional part in microsecond precision.

Examples:

> SELECT make_interval(100, 11, 1, 1, 12, 30, 01.001001);
 100 years 11 months 8 days 12 hours 30 minutes 1.001001 seconds
> SELECT make_interval(100, null, 3);
 NULL
> SELECT make_interval(0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 100.000001);
 1 months 1 days 1 minutes 40.000001 seconds

Since: 3.0.0




make_timestamp

make_timestamp(year, month, day, hour, min, sec[, timezone]) - Create timestamp from year, month, day, hour, min, sec and timezone fields.

Arguments:

  • year - the year to represent, from 1 to 9999
  • month - the month-of-year to represent, from 1 (January) to 12 (December)
  • day - the day-of-month to represent, from 1 to 31
  • hour - the hour-of-day to represent, from 0 to 23
  • min - the minute-of-hour to represent, from 0 to 59
  • sec - the second-of-minute and its micro-fraction to represent, from 0 to 60. If the sec argument equals to 60, the seconds field is set to 0 and 1 minute is added to the final timestamp.
  • timezone - the time zone identifier. For example, CET, UTC and etc.

Examples:

> SELECT make_timestamp(2014, 12, 28, 6, 30, 45.887);
 2014-12-28 06:30:45.887
> SELECT make_timestamp(2014, 12, 28, 6, 30, 45.887, 'CET');
 2014-12-27 21:30:45.887
> SELECT make_timestamp(2019, 6, 30, 23, 59, 60);
 2019-07-01 00:00:00
> SELECT make_timestamp(2019, 13, 1, 10, 11, 12, 'PST');
 NULL
> SELECT make_timestamp(null, 7, 22, 15, 30, 0);
 NULL

Since: 3.0.0




map

map(key0, value0, key1, value1, ...) - Creates a map with the given key/value pairs.

Examples:

> SELECT map(1.0, '2', 3.0, '4');
 {1.0:"2",3.0:"4"}



map_concat

map_concat(map, ...) - Returns the union of all the given maps

Examples:

> SELECT map_concat(map(1, 'a', 2, 'b'), map(3, 'c'));
 {1:"a",2:"b",3:"c"}

Since: 2.4.0




map_entries

map_entries(map) - Returns an unordered array of all entries in the given map.

Examples:

> SELECT map_entries(map(1, 'a', 2, 'b'));
 [{"key":1,"value":"a"},{"key":2,"value":"b"}]

Since: 3.0.0




map_filter

map_filter(expr, func) - Filters entries in a map using the function.

Examples:

> SELECT map_filter(map(1, 0, 2, 2, 3, -1), (k, v) -> k > v);
 {1:0,3:-1}

Since: 3.0.0




map_from_arrays

map_from_arrays(keys, values) - Creates a map with a pair of the given key/value arrays. All elements in keys should not be null

Examples:

> SELECT map_from_arrays(array(1.0, 3.0), array('2', '4'));
 {1.0:"2",3.0:"4"}

Since: 2.4.0




map_from_entries

map_from_entries(arrayOfEntries) - Returns a map created from the given array of entries.

Examples:

> SELECT map_from_entries(array(struct(1, 'a'), struct(2, 'b')));
 {1:"a",2:"b"}

Since: 2.4.0




map_keys

map_keys(map) - Returns an unordered array containing the keys of the map.

Examples:

> SELECT map_keys(map(1, 'a', 2, 'b'));
 [1,2]



map_values

map_values(map) - Returns an unordered array containing the values of the map.

Examples:

> SELECT map_values(map(1, 'a', 2, 'b'));
 ["a","b"]



map_zip_with

map_zip_with(map1, map2, function) - Merges two given maps into a single map by applying function to the pair of values with the same key. For keys only presented in one map, NULL will be passed as the value for the missing key. If an input map contains duplicated keys, only the first entry of the duplicated key is passed into the lambda function.

Examples:

> SELECT map_zip_with(map(1, 'a', 2, 'b'), map(1, 'x', 2, 'y'), (k, v1, v2) -> concat(v1, v2));
 {1:"ax",2:"by"}

Since: 3.0.0




max

max(expr) - Returns the maximum value of expr.

Examples:

> SELECT max(col) FROM VALUES (10), (50), (20) AS tab(col);
 50

Since: 1.0.0




max_by

max_by(x, y) - Returns the value of x associated with the maximum value of y.

Examples:

> SELECT max_by(x, y) FROM VALUES (('a', 10)), (('b', 50)), (('c', 20)) AS tab(x, y);
 b

Since: 3.0.0




md5

md5(expr) - Returns an MD5 128-bit checksum as a hex string of expr.

Examples:

> SELECT md5('Spark');
 8cde774d6f7333752ed72cacddb05126



mean

mean(expr) - Returns the mean calculated from values of a group.

Examples:

 > SELECT mean(col) FROM VALUES (1), (2), (3) AS tab(col);
 2.0
> SELECT mean(col) FROM VALUES (1), (2), (NULL) AS tab(col);
 1.5

Since: 1.0.0




min

min(expr) - Returns the minimum value of expr.

Examples:

> SELECT min(col) FROM VALUES (10), (-1), (20) AS tab(col);
 -1

Since: 1.0.0




min_by

min_by(x, y) - Returns the value of x associated with the minimum value of y.

Examples:

> SELECT min_by(x, y) FROM VALUES (('a', 10)), (('b', 50)), (('c', 20)) AS tab(x, y);
 a

Since: 3.0.0




minute

minute(timestamp) - Returns the minute component of the string/timestamp.

Examples:

> SELECT minute('2009-07-30 12:58:59');
 58

Since: 1.5.0




mod

expr1 mod expr2 - Returns the remainder after expr1/expr2.

Examples:

> SELECT 2 % 1.8;
 0.2
> SELECT MOD(2, 1.8);
 0.2



monotonically_increasing_id

monotonically_increasing_id() - Returns monotonically increasing 64-bit integers. The generated ID is guaranteed to be monotonically increasing and unique, but not consecutive. The current implementation puts the partition ID in the upper 31 bits, and the lower 33 bits represent the record number within each partition. The assumption is that the data frame has less than 1 billion partitions, and each partition has less than 8 billion records. The function is non-deterministic because its result depends on partition IDs.




month

month(date) - Returns the month component of the date/timestamp.

Examples:

> SELECT month('2016-07-30');
 7

Since: 1.5.0




months_between

months_between(timestamp1, timestamp2[, roundOff]) - If timestamp1 is later than timestamp2, then the result is positive. If timestamp1 and timestamp2 are on the same day of month, or both are the last day of month, time of day will be ignored. Otherwise, the difference is calculated based on 31 days per month, and rounded to 8 digits unless roundOff=false.

Examples:

> SELECT months_between('1997-02-28 10:30:00', '1996-10-30');
 3.94959677
> SELECT months_between('1997-02-28 10:30:00', '1996-10-30', false);
 3.9495967741935485

Since: 1.5.0




named_struct

named_struct(name1, val1, name2, val2, ...) - Creates a struct with the given field names and values.

Examples:

> SELECT named_struct("a", 1, "b", 2, "c", 3);
 {"a":1,"b":2,"c":3}



nanvl

nanvl(expr1, expr2) - Returns expr1 if it's not NaN, or expr2 otherwise.

Examples:

> SELECT nanvl(cast('NaN' as double), 123);
 123.0

Since: 1.5.0




negative

negative(expr) - Returns the negated value of expr.

Examples:

> SELECT negative(1);
 -1



next_day

next_day(start_date, day_of_week) - Returns the first date which is later than start_date and named as indicated.

Examples:

> SELECT next_day('2015-01-14', 'TU');
 2015-01-20

Since: 1.5.0




not

not expr - Logical not.



now

now() - Returns the current timestamp at the start of query evaluation.

Examples:

> SELECT now();
 2020-04-25 15:49:11.914

Since: 1.6.0




ntile

ntile(n) - Divides the rows for each window partition into n buckets ranging from 1 to at most n.

Arguments:

  • buckets - an int expression which is number of buckets to divide the rows in. Default value is 1.

Since: 2.0.0




nullif

nullif(expr1, expr2) - Returns null if expr1 equals to expr2, or expr1 otherwise.

Examples:

> SELECT nullif(2, 2);
 NULL

Since: 2.0.0




nvl

nvl(expr1, expr2) - Returns expr2 if expr1 is null, or expr1 otherwise.

Examples:

> SELECT nvl(NULL, array('2'));
 ["2"]

Since: 2.0.0




nvl2

nvl2(expr1, expr2, expr3) - Returns expr2 if expr1 is not null, or expr3 otherwise.

Examples:

> SELECT nvl2(NULL, 2, 1);
 1

Since: 2.0.0




octet_length

octet_length(expr) - Returns the byte length of string data or number of bytes of binary data.

Examples:

> SELECT octet_length('Spark SQL');
 9

Since: 2.3.0




or

expr1 or expr2 - Logical OR.




overlay

overlay(input, replace, pos[, len]) - Replace input with replace that starts at pos and is of length len.

Examples:

> SELECT overlay('Spark SQL' PLACING '_' FROM 6);
 Spark_SQL
> SELECT overlay('Spark SQL' PLACING 'CORE' FROM 7);
 Spark CORE
> SELECT overlay('Spark SQL' PLACING 'ANSI ' FROM 7 FOR 0);
 Spark ANSI SQL
> SELECT overlay('Spark SQL' PLACING 'tructured' FROM 2 FOR 4);
 Structured SQL
> SELECT overlay(encode('Spark SQL', 'utf-8') PLACING encode('_', 'utf-8') FROM 6);
 Spark_SQL
> SELECT overlay(encode('Spark SQL', 'utf-8') PLACING encode('CORE', 'utf-8') FROM 7);
 Spark CORE
> SELECT overlay(encode('Spark SQL', 'utf-8') PLACING encode('ANSI ', 'utf-8') FROM 7 FOR 0);
 Spark ANSI SQL
> SELECT overlay(encode('Spark SQL', 'utf-8') PLACING encode('tructured', 'utf-8') FROM 2 FOR 4);
 Structured SQL



parse_url

parse_url(url, partToExtract[, key]) - Extracts a part from a URL.

Examples:

> SELECT parse_url('http://spark.apache.org/path?query=1', 'HOST');
 spark.apache.org
> SELECT parse_url('http://spark.apache.org/path?query=1', 'QUERY');
 query=1
> SELECT parse_url('http://spark.apache.org/path?query=1', 'QUERY', 'query');
 1

Since: 2.0.0




percent_rank

percent_rank() - Computes the percentage ranking of a value in a group of values.

Arguments:

  • children - this is to base the rank on; a change in the value of one the children will trigger a change in rank. This is an internal parameter and will be assigned by the Analyser.

Since: 2.0.0




percentile

percentile(col, percentage [, frequency]) - Returns the exact percentile value of numeric column col at the given percentage. The value of percentage must be between 0.0 and 1.0. The value of frequency should be positive integral

percentile(col, array(percentage1 [, percentage2]...) [, frequency]) - Returns the exact percentile value array of numeric column col at the given percentage(s). Each value of the percentage array must be between 0.0 and 1.0. The value of frequency should be positive integral

Examples:

> SELECT percentile(col, 0.3) FROM VALUES (0), (10) AS tab(col);
 3.0
> SELECT percentile(col, array(0.25, 0.75)) FROM VALUES (0), (10) AS tab(col);
 [2.5,7.5]

Since: 2.1.0




percentile_approx

percentile_approx(col, percentage [, accuracy]) - Returns the approximate percentile value of numeric column col at the given percentage. The value of percentage must be between 0.0 and 1.0. The accuracy parameter (default: 10000) is a positive numeric literal which controls approximation accuracy at the cost of memory. Higher value of accuracy yields better accuracy, 1.0/accuracy is the relative error of the approximation. When accuracy is an array, each value of the percentage array must be between 0.0 and 1.0. In this case, returns the approximate percentile array of column col at the given percentage array.

Examples:

> SELECT percentile_approx(10.0, array(0.5, 0.4, 0.1), 100);
 [10.0,10.0,10.0]
> SELECT percentile_approx(10.0, 0.5, 100);
 10.0

Since: 2.1.0




pi

pi() - Returns pi.

Examples:

> SELECT pi();
 3.141592653589793



pmod

pmod(expr1, expr2) - Returns the positive value of expr1 mod expr2.

Examples:

> SELECT pmod(10, 3);
 1
> SELECT pmod(-10, 3);
 2



posexplode

posexplode(expr) - Separates the elements of array expr into multiple rows with positions, or the elements of map expr into multiple rows and columns with positions. Unless specified otherwise, uses the column name pos for position, col for elements of the array or key and value for elements of the map.

Examples:

> SELECT posexplode(array(10,20));
 0  10
 1  20



posexplode_outer

posexplode_outer(expr) - Separates the elements of array expr into multiple rows with positions, or the elements of map expr into multiple rows and columns with positions. Unless specified otherwise, uses the column name pos for position, col for elements of the array or key and value for elements of the map.

Examples:

> SELECT posexplode_outer(array(10,20));
 0  10
 1  20



position

position(substr, str[, pos]) - Returns the position of the first occurrence of substr in str after position pos. The given pos and return value are 1-based.

Examples:

> SELECT position('bar', 'foobarbar');
 4
> SELECT position('bar', 'foobarbar', 5);
 7
> SELECT POSITION('bar' IN 'foobarbar');
 4

Since: 1.5.0




positive

positive(expr) - Returns the value of expr.




pow

pow(expr1, expr2) - Raises expr1 to the power of expr2.

Examples:

> SELECT pow(2, 3);
 8.0



power

power(expr1, expr2) - Raises expr1 to the power of expr2.

Examples:

> SELECT power(2, 3);
 8.0



printf

printf(strfmt, obj, ...) - Returns a formatted string from printf-style format strings.

Examples:

> SELECT printf("Hello World %d %s", 100, "days");
 Hello World 100 days

Since: 1.5.0




quarter

quarter(date) - Returns the quarter of the year for date, in the range 1 to 4.

Examples:

> SELECT quarter('2016-08-31');
 3

Since: 1.5.0




radians

radians(expr) - Converts degrees to radians.

Arguments:

  • expr - angle in degrees

Examples:

> SELECT radians(180);
 3.141592653589793



rand

rand([seed]) - Returns a random value with independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) uniformly distributed values in [0, 1).

Examples:

> SELECT rand();
 0.9629742951434543
> SELECT rand(0);
 0.8446490682263027
> SELECT rand(null);
 0.8446490682263027

Note:
The function is non-deterministic in general case.

Since: 1.5.0




randn

rand([seed]) - Returns a random value with independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) uniformly distributed values in [0, 1).

Examples:

> SELECT rand();
 > SELECT randn();
 -0.3254147983080288
> SELECT randn(0);
 1.1164209726833079
> SELECT randn(null);
 1.1164209726833079

Note:
The function is non-deterministic in general case.

Since: 1.5.0




random

random([seed]) - Returns a random value with independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) uniformly distributed values in [0, 1).

Examples:

> SELECT random();
 0.9629742951434543
> SELECT random(0);
 0.8446490682263027
> SELECT random(null);
 0.8446490682263027

Note:
The function is non-deterministic in general case.

Since: 1.5.0




rank

rank() - Computes the rank of a value in a group of values. The result is one plus the number of rows preceding or equal to the current row in the ordering of the partition. The values will produce gaps in the sequence.

Arguments:

  • children - this is to base the rank on; a change in the value of one the children will trigger a change in rank. This is an internal parameter and will be assigned by the Analyser.

Since: 2.0.0




reflect

reflect(class, method[, arg1[, arg2 ..]]) - Calls a method with reflection.

Examples:

> SELECT reflect('java.util.UUID', 'randomUUID');
 c33fb387-8500-4bfa-81d2-6e0e3e930df2
> SELECT reflect('java.util.UUID', 'fromString', 'a5cf6c42-0c85-418f-af6c-3e4e5b1328f2');
 a5cf6c42-0c85-418f-af6c-3e4e5b1328f2

regexp_extract(str, regexp[, idx]) - Extracts a group that matches regexp.

Arguments:

  • str - a string expression.
  • regexp - a string representing a regular expression. The regex string should be a Java regular expression.
  • idx - an integer expression that representing the group index. The group index should be non-negative. If idx is not specified, the default group index value is 1.

Examples:

> SELECT regexp_extract('100-200', '(\\d+)-(\\d+)', 1);
 100

Since: 1.5.0




regexp_replace

regexp_replace(str, regexp, rep) - Replaces all substrings of str that match regexp with rep.

Examples:

> SELECT regexp_replace('100-200', '(\\d+)', 'num');
 num-num

Since: 1.5.0




repeat

repeat(str, n) - Returns the string which repeats the given string value n times.

Examples:

> SELECT repeat('123', 2);
 123123

Since: 1.5.0




replace

replace(str, search[, replace]) - Replaces all occurrences of search with replace.

Arguments:

  • str - a string expression
  • search - a string expression. If search is not found in str, str is returned unchanged.
  • replace - a string expression. If replace is not specified or is an empty string, nothing replaces the string that is removed from str.

Examples:

> SELECT replace('ABCabc', 'abc', 'DEF');
 ABCDEF

Since: 2.3.0




reverse

reverse(array) - Returns a reversed string or an array with reverse order of elements.

Examples:

> SELECT reverse('Spark SQL');
 LQS krapS
> SELECT reverse(array(2, 1, 4, 3));
 [3,4,1,2]

Note:
Reverse logic for arrays is available since 2.4.0.

Since: 1.5.0




right

right(str, len) - Returns the rightmost len(len can be string type) characters from the string str,if len is less or equal than 0 the result is an empty string.

Examples:

> SELECT right('Spark SQL', 3);
 SQL

Since: 2.3.0




rint

rint(expr) - Returns the double value that is closest in value to the argument and is equal to a mathematical integer.

Examples:

> SELECT rint(12.3456);
 12.0



rlike

str rlike regexp - Returns true if str matches regexp, or false otherwise.

Arguments:

  • str - a string expression
  • regexp - a string expression. The regex string should be a Java regular expression.
    Since Spark 2.0, string literals (including regex patterns) are unescaped in our SQL parser. For example, to match "\abc", a regular expression for regexp can be "^\abc$".
    There is a SQL config 'spark.sql.parser.escapedStringLiterals' that can be used to fallback to the Spark 1.6 behavior regarding string literal parsing. For example, if the config is enabled, the regexp that can match "\abc" is "^\abc$".

Examples:

> SET spark.sql.parser.escapedStringLiterals=true;
spark.sql.parser.escapedStringLiterals  true
> SELECT '%SystemDrive%\Users\John' rlike '%SystemDrive%\\Users.*';
true
> SET spark.sql.parser.escapedStringLiterals=false;
spark.sql.parser.escapedStringLiterals  false
> SELECT '%SystemDrive%\\Users\\John' rlike '%SystemDrive%\\\\Users.*';
true

Note:
Use LIKE to match with simple string pattern.

Since: 1.0.0




rollup

rollup([col1[, col2 ..]]) - create a multi-dimensional rollup using the specified columns so that we can run aggregation on them.

Examples:

> SELECT name, age, count(*) FROM VALUES (2, 'Alice'), (5, 'Bob') people(age, name) GROUP BY rollup(name, age);
  Bob   5   1
  Alice 2   1
  NULL  NULL    2
  Bob   NULL    1
  Alice NULL    1

Since: 2.0.0




round

round(expr, d) - Returns expr rounded to d decimal places using HALF_UP rounding mode.

Examples:

> SELECT round(2.5, 0);
 3

Since: 2.0.0




row_number

row_number() - Assigns a unique, sequential number to each row, starting with one, according to the ordering of rows within the window partition.

Since: 2.0.0




rpad

rpad(str, len[, pad]) - Returns str, right-padded with pad to a length of len. If str is longer than len, the return value is shortened to len characters. If pad is not specified, str will be padded to the right with space characters.

Examples:

> SELECT rpad('hi', 5, '??');
 hi???
> SELECT rpad('hi', 1, '??');
 h
> SELECT rpad('hi', 5);
 hi

Since: 1.5.0




rtrim

rtrim(str) - Removes the trailing space characters from str.

Arguments:

  • str - a string expression
  • trimStr - the trim string characters to trim, the default value is a single space

Examples:

> SELECT rtrim('    SparkSQL   ');
 SparkSQL

Since: 1.5.0




schema_of_csv

schema_of_csv(csv[, options]) - Returns schema in the DDL format of CSV string.

Examples:

> SELECT schema_of_csv('1,abc');
 struct<_c0:int,_c1:string>

Since: 3.0.0




schema_of_json

schema_of_json(json[, options]) - Returns schema in the DDL format of JSON string.

Examples:

> SELECT schema_of_json('[{"col":0}]');
 array<struct<col:bigint>>
> SELECT schema_of_json('[{"col":01}]', map('allowNumericLeadingZeros', 'true'));
 array<struct<col:bigint>>

Since: 2.4.0




second

second(timestamp) - Returns the second component of the string/timestamp.

Examples:

> SELECT second('2009-07-30 12:58:59');
 59

Since: 1.5.0




sentences

sentences(str[, lang, country]) - Splits str into an array of array of words.

Examples:

> SELECT sentences('Hi there! Good morning.');
 [["Hi","there"],["Good","morning"]]

Since: 2.0.0




sequence

sequence(start, stop, step) - Generates an array of elements from start to stop (inclusive), incrementing by step. The type of the returned elements is the same as the type of argument expressions.

Supported types are: byte, short, integer, long, date, timestamp.

The start and stop expressions must resolve to the same type. If start and stop expressions resolve to the 'date' or 'timestamp' type then the step expression must resolve to the 'interval' type, otherwise to the same type as the start and stop expressions.

Arguments:

  • start - an expression. The start of the range.
  • stop - an expression. The end the range (inclusive).
  • step - an optional expression. The step of the range. By default step is 1 if start is less than or equal to stop, otherwise -1. For the temporal sequences it's 1 day and -1 day respectively. If start is greater than stop then the step must be negative, and vice versa.

Examples:

> SELECT sequence(1, 5);
 [1,2,3,4,5]
> SELECT sequence(5, 1);
 [5,4,3,2,1]
> SELECT sequence(to_date('2018-01-01'), to_date('2018-03-01'), interval 1 month);
 [2018-01-01,2018-02-01,2018-03-01]

Since: 2.4.0




sha

sha(expr) - Returns a sha1 hash value as a hex string of the expr.

Examples:

> SELECT sha('Spark');
 85f5955f4b27a9a4c2aab6ffe5d7189fc298b92c



sha1

sha1(expr) - Returns a sha1 hash value as a hex string of the expr.

Examples:

> SELECT sha1('Spark');
 85f5955f4b27a9a4c2aab6ffe5d7189fc298b92c



sha2

sha2(expr, bitLength) - Returns a checksum of SHA-2 family as a hex string of expr. SHA-224, SHA-256, SHA-384, and SHA-512 are supported. Bit length of 0 is equivalent to 256.

Examples:

> SELECT sha2('Spark', 256);
 529bc3b07127ecb7e53a4dcf1991d9152c24537d919178022b2c42657f79a26b



shiftleft

shiftleft(base, expr) - Bitwise left shift.

Examples:

> SELECT shiftleft(2, 1);
 4



shiftright

shiftright(base, expr) - Bitwise (signed) right shift.

Examples:

> SELECT shiftright(4, 1);
 2



shiftrightunsigned

shiftrightunsigned(base, expr) - Bitwise unsigned right shift.

Examples:

> SELECT shiftrightunsigned(4, 1);
 2



shuffle

shuffle(array) - Returns a random permutation of the given array.

Examples:

> SELECT shuffle(array(1, 20, 3, 5));
 [3,1,5,20]
> SELECT shuffle(array(1, 20, null, 3));
 [20,null,3,1]

Note:
The function is non-deterministic.

Since: 2.4.0




sign

sign(expr) - Returns -1.0, 0.0 or 1.0 as expr is negative, 0 or positive.

Examples:

> SELECT sign(40);
 1.0



signum

signum(expr) - Returns -1.0, 0.0 or 1.0 as expr is negative, 0 or positive.

Examples:

> SELECT signum(40);
 1.0



sin

sin(expr) - Returns the sine of expr, as if computed by java.lang.Math.sin.

Arguments:

  • expr - angle in radians

Examples:

> SELECT sin(0);
 0.0



sinh

sinh(expr) - Returns hyperbolic sine of expr, as if computed by java.lang.Math.sinh.

Arguments:

  • expr - hyperbolic angle

Examples:

> SELECT sinh(0);
 0.0



size

size(expr) - Returns the size of an array or a map. The function returns null for null input if spark.sql.legacy.sizeOfNull is set to false or spark.sql.ansi.enabled is set to true. Otherwise, the function returns -1 for null input. With the default settings, the function returns -1 for null input.

Examples:

> SELECT size(array('b', 'd', 'c', 'a'));
 4
> SELECT size(map('a', 1, 'b', 2));
 2
> SELECT size(NULL);
 -1



skewness

skewness(expr) - Returns the skewness value calculated from values of a group.

Examples:

> SELECT skewness(col) FROM VALUES (-10), (-20), (100), (1000) AS tab(col);
 1.1135657469022011
> SELECT skewness(col) FROM VALUES (-1000), (-100), (10), (20) AS tab(col);
 -1.1135657469022011

Since: 1.6.0


slice

slice(x, start, length) - Subsets array x starting from index start (array indices start at 1, or starting from the end if start is negative) with the specified length.

Examples:

> SELECT slice(array(1, 2, 3, 4), 2, 2);
 [2,3]
> SELECT slice(array(1, 2, 3, 4), -2, 2);
 [3,4]

Since: 2.4.0


smallint

smallint(expr) - Casts the value `expr` to the target data type ```smallint```.

<br/>

---

<br/>


## **some**
some(expr) - Returns true if at least one value of `expr` is true.


**Examples:** 
```sql
> SELECT some(col) FROM VALUES (true), (false), (false) AS tab(col);
 true
> SELECT some(col) FROM VALUES (NULL), (true), (false) AS tab(col);
 true
> SELECT some(col) FROM VALUES (false), (false), (NULL) AS tab(col);
 false

Since: 3.0.0


sort_array

sort_array(array[, ascendingOrder]) - Sorts the input array in ascending or descending order according to the natural ordering of the array elements. Null elements will be placed at the beginning of the returned array in ascending order or at the end of the returned array in descending order.

Examples:

> SELECT sort_array(array('b', 'd', null, 'c', 'a'), true);
 [null,"a","b","c","d"]



soundex

soundex(str) - Returns Soundex code of the string.

Examples:

> SELECT soundex('Miller');
 M460

Since: 1.5.0


space

space(n) - Returns a string consisting of n spaces.

Examples:

> SELECT concat(space(2), '1');
   1

Since: 1.5.0


spark_partition_id

spark_partition_id() - Returns the current partition id.




split

split(str, regex, limit) - Splits str around occurrences that match regex and returns an array with a length of at most limit

Arguments:

  • str - a string expression to split.
  • regex - a string representing a regular expression. The regex string should be a Java regular expression.
  • limit - an integer expression which controls the number of times the regex is applied.
    • limit > 0: The resulting array's length will not be more than limit, and the resulting array's last entry will contain all input beyond the last matched regex.
    • limit <= 0: regex will be applied as many times as possible, and the resulting array can be of any size.

Examples:

> SELECT split('oneAtwoBthreeC', '[ABC]');
 ["one","two","three",""]
> SELECT split('oneAtwoBthreeC', '[ABC]', -1);
 ["one","two","three",""]
> SELECT split('oneAtwoBthreeC', '[ABC]', 2);
 ["one","twoBthreeC"]

Since: 1.5.0


sqrt

sqrt(expr) - Returns the square root of expr.

Examples:

> SELECT sqrt(4);
 2.0



stack

stack(n, expr1, ..., exprk) - Separates expr1, ..., exprk into n rows. Uses column names col0, col1, etc. by default unless specified otherwise.

Examples:

> SELECT stack(2, 1, 2, 3);
 1  2
 3  NULL



std

std(expr) - Returns the sample standard deviation calculated from values of a group.

Examples:

> SELECT std(col) FROM VALUES (1), (2), (3) AS tab(col);
 1.0

Since: 1.6.0




stddev

stddev(expr) - Returns the sample standard deviation calculated from values of a group.

Examples:

> SELECT stddev(col) FROM VALUES (1), (2), (3) AS tab(col);
 1.0

Since: 1.6.0




stddev_pop

stddev_pop(expr) - Returns the population standard deviation calculated from values of a group.

Examples:

> SELECT stddev_pop(col) FROM VALUES (1), (2), (3) AS tab(col);
 0.816496580927726

Since: 1.6.0




stddev_samp

stddev_samp(expr) - Returns the sample standard deviation calculated from values of a group.

Examples:

> SELECT stddev_samp(col) FROM VALUES (1), (2), (3) AS tab(col);
 1.0

Since: 1.6.0




str_to_map

str_to_map(text[, pairDelim[, keyValueDelim]]) - Creates a map after splitting the text into key/value pairs using delimiters. Default delimiters are ',' for pairDelim and ':' for keyValueDelim. Both pairDelim and keyValueDelim are treated as regular expressions.

Examples:

> SELECT str_to_map('a:1,b:2,c:3', ',', ':');
 {"a":"1","b":"2","c":"3"}
> SELECT str_to_map('a');
 {"a":null}

Since: 2.0.0




string

string(expr) - Casts the value expr to the target data type string.




struct

struct(col1, col2, col3, ...) - Creates a struct with the given field values.




substr

substr(str, pos[, len]) - Returns the substring of str that starts at pos and is of length len, or the slice of byte array that starts at pos and is of length len.

substr(str FROM pos[ FOR len]]) - Returns the substring of str that starts at pos and is of length len, or the slice of byte array that starts at pos and is of length len.

Examples:

> SELECT substr('Spark SQL', 5);
 k SQL
> SELECT substr('Spark SQL', -3);
 SQL
> SELECT substr('Spark SQL', 5, 1);
 k
> SELECT substr('Spark SQL' FROM 5);
 k SQL
> SELECT substr('Spark SQL' FROM -3);
 SQL
> SELECT substr('Spark SQL' FROM 5 FOR 1);
 k

Since: 1.5.0




substring

substring(str, pos[, len]) - Returns the substring of str that starts at pos and is of length len, or the slice of byte array that starts at pos and is of length len.

substring(str FROM pos[ FOR len]]) - Returns the substring of str that starts at pos and is of length len, or the slice of byte array that starts at pos and is of length len.

Examples:

> SELECT substring('Spark SQL', 5);
 k SQL
> SELECT substring('Spark SQL', -3);
 SQL
> SELECT substring('Spark SQL', 5, 1);
 k
> SELECT substring('Spark SQL' FROM 5);
 k SQL
> SELECT substring('Spark SQL' FROM -3);
 SQL
> SELECT substring('Spark SQL' FROM 5 FOR 1);
 k

Since: 1.5.0




substring_index

substring_index(str, delim, count) - Returns the substring from str before count occurrences of the delimiter delim. If count is positive, everything to the left of the final delimiter (counting from the left) is returned. If count is negative, everything to the right of the final delimiter (counting from the right) is returned. The function substring_index performs a case-sensitive match when searching for delim.

Examples:

> SELECT substring_index('www.apache.org', '.', 2);
 www.apache

Since: 1.5.0




sum

sum(expr) - Returns the sum calculated from values of a group.

Examples:

> SELECT sum(col) FROM VALUES (5), (10), (15) AS tab(col);
 30
> SELECT sum(col) FROM VALUES (NULL), (10), (15) AS tab(col);
 25
> SELECT sum(col) FROM VALUES (NULL), (NULL) AS tab(col);
 NULL

Since: 1.0.0




tan

tan(expr) - Returns the tangent of expr, as if computed by java.lang.Math.tan.

Arguments:

  • expr - angle in radians

Examples:

> SELECT tan(0);
 0.0



tanh

tanh(expr) - Returns the hyperbolic tangent of expr, as if computed by java.lang.Math.tanh.

Arguments:

  • expr - hyperbolic angle

Examples:

> SELECT tanh(0);
 0.0



timestamp

timestamp(expr) - Casts the value expr to the target data type timestamp.




tinyint

tinyint(expr) - Casts the value expr to the target data type tinyint.




to_csv

to_date(date_str[, fmt]) - Parses the date_str expression with the fmt expression to a date. Returns null with invalid input. By default, it follows casting rules to a date if the fmt is omitted.

Arguments:

  • date_str - A string to be parsed to date.
  • fmt - Date format pattern to follow. See Datetime Patterns for valid date and time format patterns.

Examples:

> SELECT to_date('2009-07-30 04:17:52');
 2009-07-30
> SELECT to_date('2016-12-31', 'yyyy-MM-dd');
 2016-12-31

Since: 1.5.0




to_date

to_date(date_str[, fmt]) - Parses the date_str expression with the fmt expression to a date. Returns null with invalid input. By default, it follows casting rules to a date if the fmt is omitted.

Arguments:

  • date_str - A string to be parsed to date.
  • fmt - Date format pattern to follow. See Datetime Patterns for valid date and time format patterns.

Examples:

> SELECT to_date('2009-07-30 04:17:52');
 2009-07-30
> SELECT to_date('2016-12-31', 'yyyy-MM-dd');
 2016-12-31

Since: 1.5.0




to_json

to_json(expr[, options]) - Returns a JSON string with a given struct value

Examples:

> SELECT to_json(named_struct('a', 1, 'b', 2));
 {"a":1,"b":2}
> SELECT to_json(named_struct('time', to_timestamp('2015-08-26', 'yyyy-MM-dd')), map('timestampFormat', 'dd/MM/yyyy'));
 {"time":"26/08/2015"}
> SELECT to_json(array(named_struct('a', 1, 'b', 2)));
 [{"a":1,"b":2}]
> SELECT to_json(map('a', named_struct('b', 1)));
 {"a":{"b":1}}
> SELECT to_json(map(named_struct('a', 1),named_struct('b', 2)));
 {"[1]":{"b":2}}
> SELECT to_json(map('a', 1));
 {"a":1}
> SELECT to_json(array((map('a', 1))));
 [{"a":1}]

Since: 2.2.0




to_timestamp

to_timestamp(timestamp_str[, fmt]) - Parses the timestamp_str expression with the fmt expression to a timestamp. Returns null with invalid input. By default, it follows casting rules to a timestamp if the fmt is omitted.

Arguments:

  • timestamp_str - A string to be parsed to timestamp.
  • fmt - Timestamp format pattern to follow. See Datetime Patterns for valid date and time format patterns.

Examples:

> SELECT to_timestamp('2016-12-31 00:12:00');
 2016-12-31 00:12:00
> SELECT to_timestamp('2016-12-31', 'yyyy-MM-dd');
 2016-12-31 00:00:00

Since: 2.2.0




to_unix_timestamp

to_unix_timestamp(timeExp[, format]) - Returns the UNIX timestamp of the given time.

Arguments:
*timeExp - A date/timestamp or string which is returned as a UNIX timestamp.

  • format - Date/time format pattern to follow. Ignored if timeExp is not a string. Default value is "yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss". See Datetime Patterns for valid date and time format patterns.

Examples:

> SELECT to_unix_timestamp('2016-04-08', 'yyyy-MM-dd');
 1460098800

Since: 1.6.0




to_utc_timestamp

to_utc_timestamp(timestamp, timezone) - Given a timestamp like '2017-07-14 02:40:00.0', interprets it as a time in the given time zone, and renders that time as a timestamp in UTC. For example, 'GMT+1' would yield '2017-07-14 01:40:00.0'.

Examples:

> SELECT to_utc_timestamp('2016-08-31', 'Asia/Seoul');
 2016-08-30 15:00:00

Since: 1.5.0




transform_keys

transform_keys(expr, func) - Transforms elements in a map using the function.

Examples:

> SELECT transform_keys(map_from_arrays(array(1, 2, 3), array(1, 2, 3)), (k, v) -> k + 1);
 {2:1,3:2,4:3}
> SELECT transform_keys(map_from_arrays(array(1, 2, 3), array(1, 2, 3)), (k, v) -> k + v);
 {2:1,4:2,6:3}

Since: 3.0.0




transform_values

transform_values(expr, func) - Transforms values in the map using the function.

Examples:

> SELECT transform_values(map_from_arrays(array(1, 2, 3), array(1, 2, 3)), (k, v) -> v + 1);
 {1:2,2:3,3:4}
> SELECT transform_values(map_from_arrays(array(1, 2, 3), array(1, 2, 3)), (k, v) -> k + v);
 {1:2,2:4,3:6}

Since: 3.0.0




translate

translate(input, from, to) - Translates the input string by replacing the characters present in the from string with the corresponding characters in the to string.

Examples:

> SELECT translate('AaBbCc', 'abc', '123');
 A1B2C3

Since: 1.5.0




trim

trim(str) - Removes the leading and trailing space characters from str.

trim(BOTH FROM str) - Removes the leading and trailing space characters from str.

trim(LEADING FROM str) - Removes the leading space characters from str.

trim(TRAILING FROM str) - Removes the trailing space characters from str.

trim(trimStr FROM str) - Remove the leading and trailing trimStr characters from str.

trim(BOTH trimStr FROM str) - Remove the leading and trailing trimStr characters from str.

trim(LEADING trimStr FROM str) - Remove the leading trimStr characters from str.

trim(TRAILING trimStr FROM str) - Remove the trailing trimStr characters from str.

Arguments:

  • str - a string expression
  • trimStr - the trim string characters to trim, the default value is a single space
  • BOTH, FROM - these are keywords to specify trimming string characters from both ends of the string
  • LEADING, FROM - these are keywords to specify trimming string characters from the left end of the string
  • TRAILING, FROM - these are keywords to specify trimming string characters from the right end of the string

Examples:

> SELECT trim('    SparkSQL   ');
 SparkSQL
> SELECT trim(BOTH FROM '    SparkSQL   ');
 SparkSQL
> SELECT trim(LEADING FROM '    SparkSQL   ');
 SparkSQL
> SELECT trim(TRAILING FROM '    SparkSQL   ');
     SparkSQL
> SELECT trim('SL' FROM 'SSparkSQLS');
 parkSQ
> SELECT trim(BOTH 'SL' FROM 'SSparkSQLS');
 parkSQ
> SELECT trim(LEADING 'SL' FROM 'SSparkSQLS');
 parkSQLS
> SELECT trim(TRAILING 'SL' FROM 'SSparkSQLS');
 SSparkSQ

Since: 1.5.0




trunc

trunc(date, fmt) - Returns date with the time portion of the day truncated to the unit specified by the format model fmt.

Examples:

> SELECT trunc('2019-08-04', 'week');
 2019-07-29
> SELECT trunc('2019-08-04', 'quarter');
 2019-07-01
> SELECT trunc('2009-02-12', 'MM');
 2009-02-01
> SELECT trunc('2015-10-27', 'YEAR');
 2015-01-01

Since: 1.5.0




typeof

typeof(expr) - Return DDL-formatted type string for the data type of the input.

Since: 3.0.0




ucase

ucase(str) - Returns str with all characters changed to uppercase.

Examples:

> SELECT ucase('SparkSql');
 SPARKSQL

Since: 1.0.1




unbase64

unbase64(str) - Converts the argument from a base 64 string str to a binary.

Examples:

> SELECT unbase64('U3BhcmsgU1FM');
 Spark SQL

Since: 1.5.0




unhex

unhex(expr) - Converts hexadecimal expr to binary.

Examples:

> SELECT decode(unhex('537061726B2053514C'), 'UTF-8');
 Spark SQL



unix_timestamp

unix_timestamp([timeExp[, format]]) - Returns the UNIX timestamp of current or specified time.

Arguments:
timeExp - A date/timestamp or string. If not provided, this defaults to current time.

  • format - Date/time format pattern to follow. Ignored if timeExp is not a string. Default value is "yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss". See Datetime Patterns for valid date and time format patterns.

Examples:

> SELECT unix_timestamp();
 1476884637
> SELECT unix_timestamp('2016-04-08', 'yyyy-MM-dd');
 1460041200

Since: 1.5.0




upper

upper(str) - Returns str with all characters changed to uppercase.

Examples:

> SELECT upper('SparkSql');
 SPARKSQL

Since: 1.0.1




uuid

uuid() - Returns an universally unique identifier (UUID) string. The value is returned as a canonical UUID 36-character string.

Examples:

> SELECT uuid();
 46707d92-02f4-4817-8116-a4c3b23e6266

Note:
The function is non-deterministic.




var_pop

var_pop(expr) - Returns the population variance calculated from values of a group.

Examples:

> SELECT var_pop(col) FROM VALUES (1), (2), (3) AS tab(col);
 0.6666666666666666

Since: 1.6.0




var_samp

var_samp(expr) - Returns the sample variance calculated from values of a group.

Examples:

> SELECT var_samp(col) FROM VALUES (1), (2), (3) AS tab(col);
 1.0

Since: 1.6.0




variance

variance(expr) - Returns the sample variance calculated from values of a group.

Examples:

> SELECT variance(col) FROM VALUES (1), (2), (3) AS tab(col);
 1.0

Since: 1.6.0




version

version() - Returns the Spark version. The string contains 2 fields, the first being a release version and the second being a git revision.

Since: 3.0.0




weekday

weekday(date) - Returns the day of the week for date/timestamp (0 = Monday, 1 = Tuesday, ..., 6 = Sunday).

Examples:

> SELECT weekday('2009-07-30');
 3

Since: 2.4.0




weekofyear

weekofyear(date) - Returns the week of the year of the given date. A week is considered to start on a Monday and week 1 is the first week with >3 days.

Examples:

> SELECT weekofyear('2008-02-20');
 8

Since: 1.5.0




when

CASE WHEN expr1 THEN expr2 [WHEN expr3 THEN expr4]* [ELSE expr5] END - When expr1 = true, returns expr2; else when expr3 = true, returns expr4; else returns expr5.

Arguments:

  • expr1, expr3 - the branch condition expressions should all be boolean type.
  • expr2, expr4, expr5 - the branch value expressions and else value expression should all be same type or coercible to a common type.

Examples:

> SELECT CASE WHEN 1 > 0 THEN 1 WHEN 2 > 0 THEN 2.0 ELSE 1.2 END;
 1.0
> SELECT CASE WHEN 1 < 0 THEN 1 WHEN 2 > 0 THEN 2.0 ELSE 1.2 END;
 2.0
> SELECT CASE WHEN 1 < 0 THEN 1 WHEN 2 < 0 THEN 2.0 END;
 NULL

Since: 1.5.0




window

N/A.



xpath

xpath(xml, xpath) - Returns a string array of values within the nodes of xml that match the XPath expression.

Examples:

> SELECT xpath('<a><b>b1</b><b>b2</b><b>b3</b><c>c1</c><c>c2</c></a>','a/b/text()');
 ["b1","b2","b3"]



xpath_boolean

xpath_boolean(xml, xpath) - Returns true if the XPath expression evaluates to true, or if a matching node is found.

Examples:

> SELECT xpath_boolean('<a><b>1</b></a>','a/b');
 true



xpath_double

xpath_double(xml, xpath) - Returns a double value, the value zero if no match is found, or NaN if a match is found but the value is non-numeric.

Examples:

> SELECT xpath_double('<a><b>1</b><b>2</b></a>', 'sum(a/b)');
 3.0



xpath_float

xpath_float(xml, xpath) - Returns a float value, the value zero if no match is found, or NaN if a match is found but the value is non-numeric.

Examples:

> SELECT xpath_float('<a><b>1</b><b>2</b></a>', 'sum(a/b)');
 3.0



xpath_int

xpath_int(xml, xpath) - Returns an integer value, or the value zero if no match is found, or a match is found but the value is non-numeric.

Examples:

> SELECT xpath_int('<a><b>1</b><b>2</b></a>', 'sum(a/b)');
 3



xpath_long

xpath_long(xml, xpath) - Returns a long integer value, or the value zero if no match is found, or a match is found but the value is non-numeric.

Examples:

> SELECT xpath_long('<a><b>1</b><b>2</b></a>', 'sum(a/b)');
 3



xpath_number

xpath_number(xml, xpath) - Returns a double value, the value zero if no match is found, or NaN if a match is found but the value is non-numeric.

Examples:

> SELECT xpath_number('<a><b>1</b><b>2</b></a>', 'sum(a/b)');
 3.0



xpath_short

xpath_short(xml, xpath) - Returns a short integer value, or the value zero if no match is found, or a match is found but the value is non-numeric.

Examples:

> SELECT xpath_short('<a><b>1</b><b>2</b></a>', 'sum(a/b)');
 3



xpath_string

xpath_string(xml, xpath) - Returns the text contents of the first xml node that matches the XPath expression.

Examples:

> SELECT xpath_string('<a><b>b</b><c>cc</c></a>','a/c');
 cc



xxhash64

xxhash64(expr1, expr2, ...) - Returns a 64-bit hash value of the arguments.

Examples:

> SELECT xxhash64('Spark', array(123), 2);
 5602566077635097486

Since: 3.0.0




year

year(date) - Returns the year component of the date/timestamp.

Examples:

> SELECT year('2016-07-30');
 2016

Since: 1.5.0




zip_with

zip_with(left, right, func) - Merges the two given arrays, element-wise, into a single array using function. If one array is shorter, nulls are appended at the end to match the length of the longer array, before applying function.

Examples:

> SELECT zip_with(array(1, 2, 3), array('a', 'b', 'c'), (x, y) -> (y, x));
 [{"y":"a","x":1},{"y":"b","x":2},{"y":"c","x":3}]
> SELECT zip_with(array(1, 2), array(3, 4), (x, y) -> x + y);
 [4,6]
> SELECT zip_with(array('a', 'b', 'c'), array('d', 'e', 'f'), (x, y) -> concat(x, y));
 ["ad","be","cf"]

Since: 2.4.0




|

expr1 | expr2 - Returns the result of bitwise OR of expr1 and expr2.

Examples:

> SELECT 3 | 5;
 7



~

~ expr - Returns the result of bitwise NOT of expr.

Examples:

> SELECT ~ 0;
 -1




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