Operators

!

! expr - Logical not.




%

expr1 % expr2 - Returns the remainder after expr1 / expr2.

Examples:

> SELECT 2 % 1.8;
 0.2
> SELECT MOD(2, 1.8);
 0.2



&

expr1 & expr2 - Returns the result of bitwise AND of expr1 and expr2.

Examples:

> SELECT 3 & 5;
 1



*

expr1 * expr2 - Returns expr1 * expr2.

Examples:

> SELECT 2 * 3;
 6

+

expr1 + expr2 - Returns expr1 + expr2.

Examples:

> SELECT 1 + 2;
 3



-

expr1 - expr2 - Returns expr1 - expr2.

Examples:

> SELECT 2 - 1;
 1



/

expr1 / expr2 - Returns expr1 / expr2. It always performs floating point division.

Examples:

> SELECT 3 / 2;
 1.5
> SELECT 2L / 2L;
 1.0



<

expr1 < expr2 - Returns true if expr1 is less than expr2.

Arguments:

  • expr1, expr2 - the two expressions must be same type or can be casted to a common type, and must be a type that can be ordered. For example, map type is not orderable, so it is not supported. For complex types such array/struct, the data types of fields must be orderable.

Examples:

> SELECT 1 < 2;
 true
> SELECT 1.1 < '1';
 false
> SELECT to_date('2009-07-30 04:17:52') < to_date('2009-07-30 04:17:52');
 false
> SELECT to_date('2009-07-30 04:17:52') < to_date('2009-08-01 04:17:52');
 true
> SELECT 1 < NULL;
 NULL



<=

expr1 <= expr2 - Returns true if expr1 is less than or equal to expr2.

Arguments:

  • expr1, expr2 - the two expressions must be same type or can be casted to a common type, and must be a type that can be ordered. For example, map type is not orderable, so it is not supported. For complex types such array/struct, the data types of fields must be orderable.

Examples:

> SELECT 2 <= 2;
 true
> SELECT 1.0 <= '1';
 true
> SELECT to_date('2009-07-30 04:17:52') <= to_date('2009-07-30 04:17:52');
 true
> SELECT to_date('2009-07-30 04:17:52') <= to_date('2009-08-01 04:17:52');
 true
> SELECT 1 <= NULL;
 NULL



<=>

expr1 <=> expr2 - Returns same result as the EQUAL(=) operator for non-null operands, but returns true if both are null, false if one of the them is null.

Arguments:

  • expr1, expr2 - the two expressions must be same type or can be casted to a common type, and must be a type that can be used in equality comparison. Map type is not supported. For complex types such array/struct, the data types of fields must be orderable.

Examples:

> SELECT 2 <=> 2;
 true
> SELECT 1 <=> '1';
 true
> SELECT true <=> NULL;
 false
> SELECT NULL <=> NULL;
 true



=

expr1 = expr2 - Returns true if expr1 equals expr2, or false otherwise.

Arguments:

  • expr1, expr2 - the two expressions must be same type or can be casted to a common type, and must be a type that can be used in equality comparison. Map type is not supported. For complex types such array/struct, the data types of fields must be orderable.

Examples:

> SELECT 2 = 2;
 true
> SELECT 1 = '1';
 true
> SELECT true = NULL;
 NULL
> SELECT NULL = NULL;
 NULL



==

expr1 == expr2 - Returns true if expr1 equals expr2, or false otherwise.

Arguments:

  • expr1, expr2 - the two expressions must be same type or can be casted to a common type, and must be a type that can be used in equality comparison. Map type is not supported. For complex types such array/struct, the data types of fields must be orderable.

Examples:

> SELECT 2 == 2;
 true
> SELECT 1 == '1';
 true
> SELECT true == NULL;
 NULL
> SELECT NULL == NULL;
 NULL



>

expr1 > expr2 - Returns true if expr1 is greater than expr2.

Arguments:

  • expr1, expr2 - the two expressions must be same type or can be casted to a common type, and must be a type that can be ordered. For example, map type is not orderable, so it is not supported. For complex types such array/struct, the data types of fields must be orderable.

Examples:

> SELECT 2 > 1;
 true
> SELECT 2 > '1.1';
 true
> SELECT to_date('2009-07-30 04:17:52') > to_date('2009-07-30 04:17:52');
 false
> SELECT to_date('2009-07-30 04:17:52') > to_date('2009-08-01 04:17:52');
 false
> SELECT 1 > NULL;
 NULL



>=

expr1 >= expr2 - Returns true if expr1 is greater than or equal to expr2.

Arguments:

  • expr1, expr2 - the two expressions must be same type or can be casted to a common type, and must be a type that can be ordered. For example, map type is not orderable, so it is not supported. For complex types such array/struct, the data types of fields must be orderable.

Examples:

> SELECT 2 >= 1;
 true
> SELECT 2.0 >= '2.1';
 false
> SELECT to_date('2009-07-30 04:17:52') >= to_date('2009-07-30 04:17:52');
 true
> SELECT to_date('2009-07-30 04:17:52') >= to_date('2009-08-01 04:17:52');
 false
> SELECT 1 >= NULL;
 NULL



^

expr1 ^ expr2 - Returns the result of bitwise exclusive OR of expr1 and expr2.

Examples:

> SELECT 3 ^ 5;
 6

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